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Increased Resilience to Climate Change in Northern Ghana Through the Management of Water Resources and Diversification of Livelihoods

English

The main objective of the "Increased Resilience to Climate Change in Northern Ghana Through the Management of Water Resources and Diversification of Livelihoods" programme is to enhance the resilience and adaptive capacity of rural livelihoods to climate impacts and risks on water resources in the northern region of Ghana. The objective will be achieved through key results centered on the improvement of water access and also increase institutional capacity and coordination for integrated water management to support other uses of water resources especially for the diversification of livelihoods by rural communities.

The programme targets the three regions in the northern part of Ghana: the Upper East, Upper West and Northern Regions. Compared to other regions of the country, these three northern regions have high degree of exposure to climate variability and change characterized by increasing temperatures and decreasing and erratic rainfall. These factors make the northern regions highly vulnerable to climate change and high priority regions for climate change adaptation.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-1.0546875069976 8.3564480357445)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
A conservative estimate gives a total of 60,000 people as direct beneficiaries of the project. The indirect number of beneficiaries comprises the entire population in the Volta River Basin, estimated to be 8.5 million as of 2010.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$8.2 million (according to Adaptation Fund Website)
Project Details: 

Water is recognized as a cross-cutting resource underlying the National Growth and Poverty Reduction Strategy of the Republic of Ghana and the National Water Policy with direct linkages to the realization of the Sustainable Development Goals.

The lack of potable water caused by extreme climate events such as droughts and floods, increases the exposure of people, especially women and children, to water-borne and other hygiene-related diseases such as diarrhoea, cholera. Besides household wellbeing, water plays a central role in many industrial activities. For example, hydropower generation, transportation services, tourism and the agricultural, livestock and fisheries sectors all depend on water resources. Rainwater harvesting serves as the major source of surface water for many rural communities during the rainy season. There is high agreement between national and regional analyses that vulnerability, especially to droughts, has geographical patterns and socioeconomic associations.

The country experienced severe drought in 1983. Since the late 1990s, floods have been increasingly frequent in the northern regions. Floods affected more than 300,000 people in 1999, 630,000 in 2007/08 and 140,000 in 2010, causing deaths, damaging farmlands, and destroying livelihoods. This resulted in severe hunger, which affected the poor and reduced gross domestic product for that year.

The most severe flood occurred in 2007, during which 630,000 people were affected, through losses of life and displacement, and extensive infrastructural damage and loss of crops. This phenomenon demonstrates the potential impact of climate change on Ghana’s development.

Under a changing climate, poor farmers are finding it difficult to predict the timing of rainy seasons. Consequently, it is becoming difficult manage climate risks to crop production. Failure in crop production is one of the key factors undermining food security . The World Food Programme’s (WFP) Comprehensive Food Security and Vulnerability Analysis (2009) found that 5% of the population or 1.2 million people are food insecure.

The bulk of the food insecure population is located in the northern regions: 34% in Upper West, 15% in Upper East, and 10% in Northern region. This is the equivalent of approximately 453,000 people. The three northern regions covered by this programme are the most vulnerable. Similarly, the adaptive capacity of these three regions is the lowest nationwide due to low socioeconomic development and the heavy dependence of local economies and livelihoods on rain-fed systems such as agriculture and forestry.

Decreasing annual rainfall and its increasingly erratic pattern, on the background of climate change, are adversely affecting rural livelihoods in northern Ghana and in particular agricultural and pastoral practices. Agriculture is a major driver of Ghana’s economy and employs close to 55 percent of the total labour force.

The proposed Programme will promote four types of adaptation intervention: 1. livelihood enhancement; 2. livelihood diversification; 3. ecosystem protection and enhancement; and 4. community-level water infrastructure planning. These approaches will build up financial, natural, physical and social capital of the communities. A conservative estimate gives a total of 60,000 people as direct beneficiaries of the project. The indirect number of beneficiaries comprise the entire population in the Volta River Basin, estimated to be 8.5 million as of 2010. The main indicator of vulnerability reduction will be changes in access to water and diversification of livelihood activities. Income generation will increase by 30 % in at least 50% of households in the communities.

The main adaptation benefits of the Programme are that it will be able to provide concrete inputs into water resource management planning in the northern region by ensuring that climate change concerns are taken into account. The Programme will be able to build and enhance the adaptive capacity of the ecological systems of water catchments to climate change, once the proposed measures are adopted and implemented.

This is expected to be the first showcase in the Ghana where climate concerns are taken into account and lessons learned will be replicated to other river basins of the country. The activities that will be implemented will include producing knowledge products that capture lessons learnt on management of water resources and diversification of livelihoods under climate change. The capacity to document traditional knowledge systems as well as methods for managing knowledge will be developed, as well as the engagement of community service organizations for knowledge transfer.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The main objective of the programme is to enhance the resilience and adaptive capacity of rural livelihoods to climate impacts and risks on water resources in the northern region of Ghana. The objective will be achieved through key results centered on the improvement of water access and also increase institutional capacity and coordination for integrated water management to support other uses of water resources especially for the diversification of livelihoods by rural communities.

There are three components, each with the following outcomes that will be delivered by the programme:

COMPONENT 1: WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLANNING

Outcome 1: Improved planning and management of water resources taking into account climate change impacts on surface and groundwater sources

COMPONENT 2: COMMUNITY LEVEL IMPLEMENTATION OF WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES

Outcome 2: Climate resilient management of water resources by communities in Northern Ghana

COMPONENT 3: DIVERSIFICATION OF LIVELIHOODS OF RURAL COMMUNITIES

Outcome 3: Enhanced diversification of livelihoods of communities in northern Ghana

Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Project Status: 
News and Updates: 

Northern Regions urged to embrace climate Adaptation Fund Project
Vibe Ghana

Friday 17 February 2017

The Chiefs and people of the Northern, Upper East and Upper West Regions have been urged to embrace the Adaptation Fund Project to help increase climate resilience and enhance sustainable land and water management in the areas. The Adaptation Fund was established under the Kyoto Protocol of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change in 2001 to finance concrete adaptation projects and programmes in developing countries that are particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change. The Ministry of Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation (MEST) with support from the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is implementing the project in some selected communities in the north. Mr Asher Nkegbe, the Upper East Regional Director of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), made the call when the technical team of the Project undertook separates community visits to the beneficiary communities in the Upper East Region to engage them on the project implementation and to solicit for their support in the process.

 

Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1 -  Improved planning and management of water resources taking into account climate change impacts on surface and groundwater sources

Outcome 2 - Climate resilient management of water resources by communities in Northern Ghana

Outcome 3 - Enhanced diversification of livelihoods of communities in northern Ghana

Project Dates: 
2015 to 2019

Building Resilient Communities, Wetland Ecosystems and Associated Catchments in Uganda

English

The "Building Resilient Communities, Wetland Ecosystems and Associated Catchments in Uganda" project will support the Government of Uganda in the management of critical wetlands that are being affected by a changing climate. The project will restore wetlands and their eco-system services, based on the wise-use principles and guidelines  outlined by the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands. It also supports sustainable land management practices and reforestation, resilient agricultural practices and alternative livelihoods for communities living in these areas. This support will reduce the pressures on the wetlands. Finally the project seeks to strengthen the climate information and early warning systems to support these communities to make climate-resilient decisions.

The impact of climate change, coupled with other human and environmental stressors, is increasing degradation of wetlands and their associated ecosystem services in Uganda. This is negatively affecting the livelihoods of the people living in and around the wetlands – around 4,000,000 people. In fact, over 80% of the people living adjacent to wetland areas in Uganda directly use wetland resources for their household food security needs. Given that wetlands are highly vulnerable to changes in the quantity and quality of their water supply, climate change will most likely substantially alter ecologically important attributes of wetlands and will exacerbate the impacts from human activity. On the other hand, the loss of wetlands could exacerbate the impact of climate change in as they provide fundamental services that contribute to mitigation of such impacts.

 

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (32.695312486957 0.89058628208695)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
800,000 people living in and around the wetlands of Southwestern and Eastern Uganda.
Funding Source: 

News article

ProDocs

GCF Funding Proposal Uganda

Financing Amount: 
US$45 million total, US$24.9 million from Green Climate Fund, US$20.1 million from Government of Uganda and UNDP
Project Details: 

Uganda, wetlands provide many important functions to the people, particularly in the context of food security. This is in addition to its role as a habitat for biodiversity that is also important for the economy. According to a recent 2013 study on the value of wetlands in Uganda, several market and non-market benefits are identified: “The market benefits include water for domestic use and watering of livestock, support to dry season agriculture, provision of handicrafts, building materials, and food resources such as fish, yams, vegetables, wild game, and medicine. The non-market benefits include flood control, purification of water, and maintenance of the water table, microclimate moderation, and storm protection. Wetlands also serve as habitats for important flora and fauna, have aesthetic and heritage values, and contain stocks of biodiversity of potentially high pharmaceutical value. Over 80% of the people living adjacent to wetland areas in Uganda directly use wetland resources for their household food security needs.” In addition to supporting food and water security, wetlands also support income generation and employment. “Of a total population of 34 million Ugandans, it is estimated that wetlands provide about 320,000 workers with direct employment and provide subsistence employment for over 2.4 million.”

Wetland health and resilience can easily be compromised by climate change impacts. Climate change models for Uganda predict that temperatures will continue to increase, and there will be changes in the seasonal distribution and amount of rainfalls, more frequent extreme weather events, and increases in the frequency of heavy rainfalls. Increases in temperature and erratic rainfall will result in more frequent and intense floods, droughts and heat waves, which will directly threaten wetlands and livelihoods that rely on its healthy ecosystem services. Hydrologic and drainage maps of the project targeted sites (the eastern and southwestern Wetlands Basin) indicate that most of the freshwater inflows pass through the wetlands and natural forests. These systems have played an integral role in maintaining the quality of water over the centuries. However, over the last three decades, climate change impacts, as well as other baseline (non-climate) issues such as excessive sedimentation and non-native species invasions, have resulted in substantial water quality deterioration.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Output 1: Restoration and management of wetland hydrology and associated forests
Under this sub-component, at least 760 km2 of degraded wetlands and its associated catchment will be restored and the lives of 500,000 people will be improved in selected districts of Eastern and South Western Uganda. The overall aim of the intervention is to restore the ecological and hydrological integrity of the wetland and support the development and implementation of a community-based framework for wetland management plans. This will help support climate risk management and resilient livelihoods through enhanced ecosystems services in the area.

Output 2: Improved agricultural practices and alternative livelihood options in the wetland catchment
This output will target at least 150,000 farmers including those who currently do not have secure access to irrigation, land-poor farmers, women-headed households, and the landless, to build more climate-resilient livelihoods. Investments in small-scale rural infrastructure (shallow bore wells, drip irrigation, tilling tools) for agricultural purposes, especially on-farm water management infrastructure such as dams, canals, drip irrigation systems, as well as farming best practices and crop diversification will be implemented to realize high economic return given their coverage. In addition, the output will focus on technical skills training for employment in key economic sectors viable in wetland areas, such as tourism, health and construction. Most of the beneficiaries have very low levels of education and no skills that can help them find a job. Beneficiaries will be trained in specific skills with high employability potential (e.g. earth mover, driver, assistant nurse, reception clerk in hotels, desktop publishing).Output 3: Strengthening access to climate and early warning information to farmers and other target communities to support wetland management

Output 3: Strengthening access to climate and early warning information to farmers and other target communities to support wetland management
This output will focus on strengthening access to reliable climate-related information and scaling up advisories for farmers and other target communities in the two wetland target areas, to improve the adaptation capacity of the entire population in and around the wetlands – around 1 million people. This will include the expansion of networks that generate and process climate-related data into relevant information to the scale and location of local districts, villages or communities, as well as dissemination of climate-related information/services, advisories and early warnings to communities. A strong focus of this output will be on delivering actionable climate-related information to communities, taking the form of agro-met advisories for agriculture, as well as the dissemination channels for making information available to the “last mile.”

Contacts: 
UNDP
Benjamin Larroquette
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
Green Climate Fund
Project Status: 
News and Updates: 

Funded Activity Agreement (FAA) effectiveness reached: 6 July 2017
Project Document signature between UNDP and Government: 7 July 2017
Request from UNDP to GCF to release funding: 13 October 2017
Inception Workshop - Begin Project Implementation: 29 November 2017

 

 

 

Exposure

 

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In the News

Government of Uganda and UNDP launch implementation of a $44.26 million project to restore wetlands and build community resilience

The Government of Uganda and United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) have kick-started a new project on "building community resilience, wetlands ecosystems and associated catchments in Uganda." The new project, which is Uganda’s first Green Climate Fund-financed initiative, is a response to the Presidential Initiative on Wetlands. The project inception meeting held on 29 November 2017 marks the start of project implementation and comes after both entities signed a financing agreement in August 2017 for the project, which is intended to restore degraded wetlands, improve ecosystems, and strengthen climate information and early warning systems. The grant based project will target an estimated 4 million people who live in and around Uganda’s wetlands and rely on them for food security. It is part of both the Government Uganda and United Nations efforts to promote Sustainable Development Goal 13 on climate action as well as fulfil its obligations to the Paris Agreement on Climate Change which it ratified last year. “Fighting climate change and its effects is now a key goal for the Government of Uganda. We are delighted that this project is going to enable us to respond to the President’s call to protect wetlands and boost our ongoing efforts in climate change mitigation and adaptation,” Hon. Mary Goretti Kitutu, the State Minister Environment, said at the inception workshop for the project.

 

Uganda, UNDP Sign Landmark Financing Agreement to Restore Wetlands

Chimp Reports
25 August 2017

The Government of Uganda and United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) have today August 23 signed a financing agreement for the Green Climate Fund (GCF) project to restore degraded wetlands, improve ecosystems, strengthen climate information and early warning systems. Hon. Matia Kasaija, the Finance Minister signed on behalf of the Government and Ms. Rosa Malango, the UNDP Resident Representative and UN Resident Coordinator for Uganda signed on behalf of UNDP.

 

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Display Photo: 
About (Summary): 
The Building Resilient Communities, Wetland Ecosystems and Associated Catchments in Uganda project will support the Government of Uganda in the management of critical wetlands that are being affected by a changing climate. The project will restore wetlands and their eco-system services, based on the wise-use principles and guidelines outlined by the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands. It also supports sustainable land management practices and reforestation, resilient agricultural practices and alternative livelihoods for communities living in these areas. This support will reduce the pressures on the wetlands. Finally the project seeks to strengthen the climate information and early warning systems to support these communities to make climate-resilient decisions. The impact of climate change, coupled with other human and environmental stressors, is increasing degradation of wetlands and their associated ecosystem services in Uganda. This is negatively affecting the livelihoods of the people living in and around the wetlands – around 4,000,000 people. In fact, over 80% of the people living adjacent to wetland areas in Uganda directly use wetland resources for their household food security needs. Given that wetlands are highly vulnerable to changes in the quantity and quality of their water supply, climate change will most likely substantially alter ecologically important attributes of wetlands and will exacerbate the impacts from human activity. On the other hand, the loss of wetlands could exacerbate the impact of climate change in as they provide fundamental services that contribute to mitigation of such impacts.
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

 

Output 1: Restoration and management of wetland hydrology and associated forests 

 

Output 2: Improved agricultural practices and alternative livelihood options in the wetland catchment

 

Output 3: Strengthening access to climate and early warning information to farmers and other target communities to support wetland management

 

 

Project Dates: 
2017 to 2025
Timeline: 
Month-Year: 
Jul 2015
Description: 
GCF FP Submission (first)
Month-Year: 
May 2017
Description: 
GCF FP Submission (last)
Month-Year: 
Dec 2016
Description: 
GCF Board Approval
Month-Year: 
Jul 2017
Description: 
FAA Effectiveness
Month-Year: 
Sep 2017
Description: 
Disbursement Request Submission
Month-Year: 
Oct 2017
Description: 
Actual Date of First Installment (from GCF)
Month-Year: 
Nov 2017
Description: 
Inception Workshop
Proj_PIMS_id: 
5711

Capacity Development for Improved National and International Environmental Management in Seychelles

The Environment Management Plan of Seychelles (EMPS) is the principal institutional mechanism for addressing national and international environmental concerns. Currently, there is a lack of a comprehensive framework for linking these concerns with other national development priorities. Further, as a result of deficiencies in the current institutional and policy framework, there are unnecessary divisions between sectors, ministries and organizations/NGOs involved in conservation.

This UNDP-supported, GEF Trust funded project therefore, is designed to address key institutional barriers and related capacity limitations that constrain the effectiveness of the current EMPS operations. It will also help integrate local and global environmental management and enhance the capacity to implement global environmental management objectives within national programmes.

Undefined
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (55.4809570005 -4.62570406121)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Department of Environment, which is responsible for the implementation of the EMPS in Seychelles
Financing Amount: 
$400,000 (as detailed in the Project Document)

ProDocs

Seychelles – GEF Trust Project Document

Co-Financing Total: 
$260,000 (as detailed in the Project Document)
Project Details: 

(More information to come)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

 

The project has three major outcomes with the following associated outputs –

  1. Awareness and capacity are developed for mainstreaming global environment conventions into national programmes. This will include a review, extension and incorporation of the international commitments in the EMPS (Outcome 1.1); Establishment of a new EMPS Secretariat (Output 1.2); Identification and appointment of National Centres of Expertise for EMPS implementation (Output 1.3) and; Training of key technical and management staff from lead stakeholder groups on the global environmental conventions and mainstreaming opportunities (Outcome 1.4)
  2. Environmental information and reporting is strengthened through the development of a central environmental database on key indicators related to global conventions (Outcome 2.1) and a “State of the Environment” reporting framework (Outcome 2.2)
  3. Capacity for local implementation of global environmental conventions is developed, applied and disseminated. This will be achieved through the development of an institutional framework (legal and organizational basis) for mainstreaming global objectives into local land and water management in residential and rural contexts (Outcome 3.1); Development of a training programme for promoting integrated implementation of climate change, biodiversity and land management objectives in land and water management at the local level (Outcome 3.2); Training of government staff, NGOs and local stakeholders on integrated approaches to Rio Conventions implementation at the local level (Outcome 3.3); Design of demonstration sub-projects to promote integrated environmental management at the local level (Outcome 3.4) and; Monitoring, reporting and dissemination of experiences that support Rio Conventions implementation (Outcome 3.5)
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

 

Project monitoring and evaluation will be conducted in accordance with established UNDP and GEF procedures.

The Programme Coordination Unit (PCU) will be responsible for day-to-day monitoring activities including submission of (i) Inception Report; (ii) Annual Project Report; (iii) Project Implementation Review; (iv) Quarterly Progress Reports; and (v) Project Terminal Report.

Annual Monitoring will occur through the Tripartite Project Review (TPR). The TPR will be composed of representatives of GOS, UNDP and the Project. Additionally, the project will be subjected to at least one independent external evaluation.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Tom Twining Ward
Regional Technical Advisor
Location: 
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

(More information to come)

Mainstreaming GE Aspects in the Planning and Monitoring processes of the NHDI in Morocco

This issue of direct and indirect poverty and environment nexus has been recognized by the government in the context of currently launched National Human Development Initiative that aims at addressing poverty issues by introducing effective decentralized system of governance and natural resource management. This process has been informed by NCSA that highlighted importance of capacity development for achievement of mutually reinforcing goals of NHDI and global environmental objectives as stemmed from the “Rio Conventions”.

The cross-cutting capacity building project is designed in closed partnership with NHDI process and will reinforce its effectiveness by a full-fledge global environmental mainstreaming into the process of local development. Benefits of global environmental management through improved land and water management, reversing habitat loss, climate risk management and low carbon development trajectories will be brought into the local development agenda. Local development, supported by the flagship NHDI process, is inherently a cross-sectorial process, whereby all sectoral objectives are brought together in the context of territorial planning and socio-economic development at sub-national level. Therefore, integrating global environmental management targets synergistically into the context of local development offers the way of effective and efficient implementation of Morocco’s obligations to the Rio Conventions.

Undefined
Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-6.85224049038 33.9875858922)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Through improved identification of national circumstances, government agencies and other actors will increase their abilities to insulate at risk urban and rural populations from the adverse effects of climate change.
Financing Amount: 
460,000
Co-Financing Total: 
100,000
Project Details: 

Project Summary

During the last 30 years, Morocco has embarked on a gradual, but solid program of human development and political liberalization. Since the 1970s, gross national income per person has more than tripled from $550 to $1750. The average life expectancy has increased from 55 in 1970 to 71 in 2005. One of the key development challenges is Morocco’s high incidence of poverty. Although poverty has declined from 19 to an estimated 15 percent over the period from 1999 to 2004, this rate remains high. Poverty continues to be typically a rural phenomenon, with more than 25 percent of the rural population living below the poverty line, compared to just 12 percent of the urban population. The depth and severity of poverty is also much higher in rural areas, and has increased significantly since 1991. Apart from macro economic, governance and rule of law and socio-economic causes high incidents of poverty largely relate to agriculture and food production systems, chronic water scarcity that in prolonged drought situations often aggravate shortages. Clearly poverty is subject to deterioration in the event of repeated drought and the ensuing low growth rates.

This issue of direct and indirect poverty and environment nexus has been recognized by the government in the context of currently launched National Human Development Initiative that aims at addressing poverty issues by introducing effective decentralized system of governance and natural resource management. This process has been informed by NCSA that highlighted importance of capacity development for achievement of mutually reinforcing goals of NHDI and global environmental objectives as stemmed from the “Rio Conventions”.

The cross-cutting capacity building project is designed in closed partnership with NHDI process and will reinforce its effectiveness by a full-fledge global environmental mainstreaming into the process of local development. Benefits of global environmental management through improved land and water management, reversing habitat loss, climate risk management and low carbon development trajectories will be brought into the local development agenda. Local development, supported by the flagship NHDI process, is inherently a cross-sectorial process, whereby all sectoral objectives are brought together in the context of territorial planning and socio-economic development at sub-national level. Therefore, integrating global environmental management targets synergistically into the context of local development offers the way of effective and efficient implementation of Morocco’s obligations to “Rio Conventions”.

The Commitment of Morocco to the Rio Conventions

Morocco has ratified the Rio Conventions in order to subscribe to the international framework of global environmental management and has, likewise, met its commitments through the adoption of strategies and reports to the conventions.

The National Capacity Self-Assessment (NCSA) as the basis of the Project

The NCSA Project, which was launched in 2004 and operationally completed in 2006, sought to identify national priorities and requirements in terms of capacity enhancement in the area of global environmental management, notably in what concerns Biodiversity, Climate Change, and Desertification. The aim was to catalyze sustained actions both at the national and local levels. The NCSA undertook eight consultations which fall within its agenda, notably in what concerns the inventory of Conventions: identification of capacities which warrant enhancement; and developing capacity-building strategy.

Among the essential priorities identified and recommended by the NCSA, enhancement of capacities of local actors (communities and authorities) so that they may better translate national commitments to the three conventions into concrete local actions is among the top priorities. Current process of decentralisation dictates a greater emphasis on local capacities to enable more effective local decision-making and action. This has been identified as strong recommendation of NCSA in Morocco which constitutes the basis of the present project.

Project Conformity with GEF Guidelines

The proposed project addresses the objectives of the three GEF focal areas (biodiversity, climate change, and sustainable land management), and specifically fits under the strategic priority related to Cross-cutting Capacity-Building (CB-2). The project is also fully in line with the Interim Guidelines for Cross-cutting Capacity Building Projects. The project is specifically in line with the CB-2 programming framework related to: “Mainstreaming Global Environmental Priorities into National Policies and Programs,” whereby the CB-2 projects would focus on developing capacities for countries to improve their ability to meet their obligations under the three Rio Conventions by integrating global environmental priorities into national policies, plans and programs, particularly macro-economic and poverty-reduction programs/strategies.

The Context of Sustainable Development

Morocco has developed a whole set of plans, strategies, and programs covering land-use planning, rural development, natural resources management, and, more recently, human development. Some of these plans, strategies, and programs are manifestly sector-based in scope. Others are cross-cutting in their scope and aim at shoring up sustainable development by addressing poverty-reduction and environmental degradation. Below are some of the strategies and programs which are directly linked with the present project:

  • The National Strategy for the Protection of the Environment and Sustainable Development, and its National Action Plan;
  • Agricultural and Rural Development Strategies;
  • The National Tourism Strategy;
  • The National Energy Strategy;
  • Hydraulic Resources Management Strategies.

Morocco has also developed significant legal mechanisms relating to sustainable development and environmental management. Nevertheless, the updating of the legal framework now proves to be necessary and urgent. The current framework needs to be supported by robust environmental data and strategic directions to address the various threats country’s natural resources. Improvement of legal framework and a decision-making set up are necessary for the implementation of the Rio Conventions. This will also contribute to the consolidation of the rule of law and will foster progress and sustainable human development.

At the local level, the main tool of local planning is the Plan for Economic and Social Development (PESD), which is established annually by the Communal Council and transmitted to the Provincial entities for budgetary allocation. The development process of the PESD doesn't integrate such mechanisms as consultations with local communities, nor does it make use of any clear and transparent method for determining and organizing local needs. The basis of this project is to contribute to the consolidation of this PESD development process and integrating the global environmental objectives in this process.

The institutional Context relating to the Global Environment

Several public and non-public institutions in Morocco are closely involved in the implementation of policies and programs pertaining sustainable development and the global environmental management. The key governmental institutions will be directly engaged into this project. The project is based on partnership with local authorities at the communal, provincial, and regional levels. The partnership will materialise through a set-up of consultation mechanisms between various elected councils (regional, provincial, and communal) and their chairpersons and the representatives of local authorities –namely the Wali (of the region); the Governor (of the province), and the Caid (of the community). The project will also ensure the involvement of local and national NGOs, as well as local and village organizations and associations (Cooperatives, Women’s Associations, Village Associations).

The NHDI and its linkages with the GE issues

It is essentially this inadequacy in the development of the PESD which the NHDI attempts to address at the level of 403 rural communes and 250 urban communes which have been declared as being priority areas for intervention. The NHDI has opted for a participatory and consultation-based process for the devising of a local development plan which will be developed by 2010 and culminate in the drawing up of PESDs for all the country’s communes. Contributing to this process. The integration of the environmental component constitutes the basis of the present project.

All three conventions recognise the linkages between the global environmental management issues and efforts for poverty reduction. The NHDI process drives the poverty reduction agenda in Morocco, whereby global environmental management issues, such as desertification and drought, biodiversity loss and climate change will be brought into the mainstay of this local development process. The OECD guidelines about the integration of Rio conventions into the development underline importance of global environment mainstreaming into the poverty reduction strategies and other national or local planning processes.

The proposed project will follow the key principles and recommendations outlined into the OECD/DAC guidelines and in so doing, avoid creating specific capacities tailored to1 the demands of the Conventions, but isolated from the national policy and planning process . The project will also apply OECD’s good practice guidance on environmental mainstreaming by applying Strategic Environmental Assessment methodology2. The project is already conceived in a way that allows SEA tools and methods to be employed. By targeting a nation-wide, local development planning process (NHDI) the integration of global environmental issues will take place in a comprehensive way, encompassing priority setting, budgeting as well as indicator framework for monitoring and evaluation, constituting the entire cycle. This methodology will help ensure a full-fledge integration.

Besides the considerable funds (10 billion Dirhams to be invested between 2006 and 2010) that have been earmarked for its programs, the magnitude of NHDI may also be appreciated by way of its overall approach, which takes into account decentralization and increasing de- centralization of State structures. The NHDI thus provides an important basis for conception and implementation of the project.

Other Key Initiatives relating to the Project:

  • The National Master plan for Land-Use Planning (NMLUP) and the Regional Master plan for Land Use Planning (RMLUP);
  • The Master-plan for Training of Local Authorities
  • Project's strategy in the Integration of GE in the Planning and Monitoring Processes of the NHDI and local strategic planning

All the actors operating in the area of development have agreed that the inadequate capacities of local actors constitute a major obstacle to any successful establishment of a perennial dynamics of local development. The same observation has been made by the NCSA: these insufficiencies thwart the creation of synergies conducive to the implementation of the three Conventions and their effective incorporation into the reality of local communities.

The project has identified a strong demand for the integration of GE aspects in the existing consultation and planning tools. There is not a real need for re-inventing new tools, for many programs, notably the NHDI and the current local strategic planning process, have efficient tools. The problem has to do with the fact that the environmental aspect is not sufficiently addressed, especially country’s global environmental objectives as per conventions’ requirements. Notwithstanding the multiplicity of planning tools, the NHDI and the local strategic planning process, stand out as being the most complete and is thus poised to be extended to all the country’s communes. For the time being, the NHDI covers 403 rural communes and 250 urban communes and the local strategic development Plan covers remaining rural communes. But the process will steadily be adopted by the other communes.

Moreover, besides the considerable funds that they allocate to a whole range of projects on the basis of a participatory approach, the NHDI and the local strategic planning process are to be appreciated for the overall approach which takes into account the de-centralization of State structures. For all these reasons, and thanks to a close partnership with the key champions of the process, the 2 initiatives have been selected as a powerful vector for this project. NCSA has likewise identified the main constraints at the systemic, institutional, and individual levels that will be addressed by the project

The project has thus been elaborated taking into account the above stakes and the long-term goal of fulfilling country commitments to the global environmental management in the context of fiscal and governance decentralization process currently underway. The project specific objective is to integrate global environmental objectives of Morocco into the NHDI and local strategic development planning, budgeting and monitoring processes. 

Source: Morocco's Request for Funding Under the GEF Trust Fund (April, 2009)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • Outcome 1: The institutional framework for the integration of GE management in the NHDI and local strategic development planning and monitoring is developed.
    • Output 1.1: Methodological approaches and tools for integrating global environmental commitments into the development planning at local level are consolidated and introduced.
    • Output 1.2: The institutional mandates and procedures for environmental mainstreaming at the provincial, regional and national levels are clarified.
    • Output 1.3: A set of global environmental indicators to be part of the monitoring system of the NHDI and strategic local plans is introduced.
  • Outcome 2: The capacities for systematic mainstreaming of the global environmental targets into the local planning are developed
    • Output 2.1: Priority global environmental targets to be addressed by the project are identified and agreed upon by all project partners as part of the NHDI and strategic local planning activities.
    • Output 2.2: The capacities of concerned stakeholders to integrate priority GE issues into local development planning are strengthened by targeted training, procedural and institutional arrangements.
    • Output 2.3: Testing a new planning approach with global environmental targets and indicators at local and regional level in the framework of NHDI and strategic local planning process for methodological validation and procedural approval.
  • Outcome 3: A system of project’s adaptive management and lessons learned established
    • Output 3.1: Project management infrastructure in place.
    • Output 3.2: Communication and knowledge management mechanisms established and operational to identify lessons and good practices for global environmental mainstreaming into the development planning.
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project Start:

Project Inception Workshop: will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. 

Daily:

Day to day monitoring of implementation progress: will be the responsibility of the Project Manager, based on the project's Annual Work Plan and its indicators, with overall guidance from the Project Director. The Project Team will inform the UNDP-CO of any delays or difficulties faced during implementation so that the appropriate support or corrective measures can be adopted in a timely and remedial fashion.

Quarterly:

Project Progress Reports (PPR): quarterly reports will be assembled based on the information recorded and monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Management Platform. Risk analysis will be logged and regularly updated in ATLAS.

Annually:

Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR): This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and GEF reporting requirements.  

Periodic Monitoring through Site Visits:

UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-Term of Project Cycle:

Mid-Term Evaluation: will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project’s term.  

End of Project:

Final Evaluation: will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and GEF guidance.  The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project’s results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals.  The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities.

Project Terminal Report: This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lie out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project’s results.

Learning and Knowledge Sharing:

Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. 

The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects.

Finally, there will be a two-way flow of information between this project and other projects of a similar focus. 

Contacts: 
UNDP
Tom Twining-Ward
Regional Technical Advisor
UNDP
El Kebir Mdarhri Alaoui
Country Officer
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 

Capacity Building for Environmental Policy Institutions for Integration of Global Environment Commitments in Montenegro

Project component 1 focuses on developing national capacities for improved management and implementation of the three Rio Conventions by developing global environmental management indicators as part of the Montenegro's environmental governance regime. Component 2 of the project is a complementary capacity building set of activities, developing individual and institutional capacities to use global environmental management indicators as a monitoring tool to assess the intervention performance and institutional sustainability.

Montenegro's National Capacity Self-Assessment (NCSA) identified a number of common weaknesses in the national implementation of the Rio Conventions. As a result, the NCSA Action Plan prioritized a suite of national cross-cutting capacity development actions. The top priority action identified was to harmonize the country's environmental legislative framework so that it becomes fully compliant with Rio Convention commitments. This project will be an important contribution to this objective by developing and piloting the application of global environmental management indicators that will help Montenegro assess the extent to which policy interventions are achieving global environmental benefits.

Undefined
Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (19.2736966782 42.426152143)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Through improved identification of national circumstances, government agencies and other actors will increase their abilities to insulate at risk urban and rural populations from the adverse effects of climate change.
Financing Amount: 
500,000
Co-Financing Total: 
590,000
Project Details: 

As a priority objective of the three Rio Conventions, donors and the GEF, the strategic approach of capacity development is directed towards facilitating cross-sectoral and participatory approaches to natural resource management planning and implementation. Guided by the GEF “Strategic Approach to Enhance Capacity Building”, approved by the GEF Council in November 2003, this Multi-Focal Area project is guided by the principle of targeting capacity development activities across focal areas (cross-cutting) in order to create synergies.

Project component 1 focuses on developing national capacities for improved management and implementation of the three Rio Conventions by developing global environmental management indicators as part of the Montenegro's environmental governance regime. Component 2 of the project is a complementary capacity building set of activities, developing individual and institutional capacities to use global environmental management indicators as a monitoring tool to assess the intervention performance and institutional sustainability.

Montenegro's National Capacity Self- Assessment (NCSA) identified a number of common weaknesses in the national implementation of the Rio Conventions. As a result, the NCSA Action Plan prioritized a suite of national cross-cutting capacity development actions. The top priority action identified was to harmonize the country's environmental legislative framework so that it becomes fully compliant with Rio Convention commitments. This project will be an important contribution to this objective by developing and piloting the application of global environmental management indicators that will help Montenegro assess the extent to which policy interventions are achieving global environmental benefits.

Montenegro has approved a number of strategies and plans to address the causes and impacts of climate change, biodiversity and land degradation. Despite these positive developments there still exists a considerable fragmentation of mandates and responsibilities within and among many institutions in the field of environment. The Ministry for Sustainable Development and Tourism (MSDT) is not the only ministry responsible for aspects of environmental protection. The largest area of environmental policy that is not within the mandate of the Ministry of Spatial Planning and Environment (MSPE) is water, which instead falls under the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Foods (MAFF).

A number of other ministries are responsible for certain aspects of environmental protection, such as the Ministry of Health, which is responsible for the management and treatment of medical waste and the Ministry of Transport, Maritime Affairs and Telecommunications, which is responsible for addressing the causes and impacts of marine pollution. There are a number of other national administrative institutions that serve to implement and enforce environment-related provisions of national policies, programmes and plans, such as the Hydrometeorological Institute, the Seismological Institute and the Office of Public Works.

The Environmental Protection Agency was established in order to effectively perform professional activities related to environmental monitoring, collection and dissemination of data and coordination and management of the national information system of environmental protection.

The expected outcome of this project is that a systematic and sustainable approach to assessing global environmental achievements through the implementation of national policies, programmes and plans has been initiated. This project will also be an important contribution to the national experiences in developing and implementing tools and practices for measuring, reporting, and verifying the cost-effectiveness of official development assistance to implementing multilateral environmental agreements, in particular the Rio Conventions.

The project is targeting the use and mainstreaming of global environmental indicators within the construct of regional development and spatial planning with a view to meeting the objectives of global environmental conventions at the national, regional, district and municipal levels. The EMIS will also help the EPA to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of policies, programmes, and plans structured to meet environment and development objectives under the overall rubric of the NSSD.

A Data Flow System (with specific protocols regarding the collection, storage, analysis and dissemination of the data based on indicators) will be designed for EPA and Hydro-meteorological Institute, as well as other institutions concerned with CBD, CCD, and FCCC implementation. The project is reconciling these global environmental indicators with other target indicators that are being introduced to assess the implementation of the National Spatial Plan 2020 and Tourism Master Plan 2020 at the regional level, with special attention to assessing low-emission, climate resilient development strategies (LECRDS).

Source: Montenegro and the GEF (2011)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • Outcome 1: Environmental management information system and indicator framework for global environmental management developed and applied on a pilot basis
    • Output 1.1: Set of uniform indicators and guidance for application developed for measuring the contribution of regional development policy and spatial planning to meeting global environmental objectives
    • Output 1.2: Data Flow System (regulations / protocols) designed and introduced for institutions concerned with CBD, CCD, UNFCCC and issues
    • Output 1.3: A web-based advanced tools for environmental data / metadata storage for environmental policy formulation tested and adopted
    • Output 1.4: Application of indicator system for global environment integration piloted in relation to National Spatial Plan-2020 and Tourism Master Plan - 2020
  • Outcome 2: Institutional capacity of the Environmental Protection Agency strengthened to perform compliance monitoring in relation to global environmental conventions and a system of knowledge management established
    • Output 2.1: Institutional reforms (based on a functional analysis performed through a consultative process) undertaken to enable incorporation of global environment commitments into planning and monitoring processes
    • Output 2.2: Accredited training programme developed and delivered for the Environmental Protection Agency staff and other relevant organizations (on advanced planning tools, information systems for global and national environmental management, indicators and trend analysis methods)
    • Output 2.3: The “Environmental Sustainability Theme Manager Office” system for integration of global environmental objectives customized and introduced at the Environmental Protection Agency
    • Output 2.4: M&E and risk management system established
    • Output 2.5: A web-based environmental project database for improved coordination and output analysis established
  • Outcome 3: Knowledge sharing and project management
    • Output 3.1: Project communication strategy developed
    • Output 3.2: Lessons learned and knowledge products produced
    • Output 3.3: Project website for wider dissemination established
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project Start:

Project Inception Workshop: will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. 

Daily:

Day to day monitoring of implementation progress: will be the responsibility of the Project Manager, based on the project's Annual Work Plan and its indicators, with overall guidance from the Project Director. The Project Team will inform the UNDP-CO of any delays or difficulties faced during implementation so that the appropriate support or corrective measures can be adopted in a timely and remedial fashion.

Quarterly:

Project Progress Reports (PPR): quarterly reports will be assembled based on the information recorded and monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Management Platform. Risk analysis will be logged and regularly updated in ATLAS.

Annually:

Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR): This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and GEF reporting requirements.  

Periodic Monitoring through Site Visits:

UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-Term of Project Cycle:

Mid-Term Evaluation: will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project’s term.  

End of Project:

Final Evaluation: will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and GEF guidance.  The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project’s results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals.  The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities.

Project Terminal Report: This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lie out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project’s results.

Learning and Knowledge Sharing:

Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. 

The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects.

Finally, there will be a two-way flow of information between this project and other projects of a similar focus. 

 

Contacts: 
UNDP
Tom Twining-Ward
Regional Technical Advisor
UNDP
Milica Begovic
Country Officer
UNDP
Snezana Marstijepovic
Project Coordinator
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 

Strengthening Environmental Fiscal Reform for National and Global Environment Management in Moldova

The project targets Capacity Development Objective 4, which calls for the development of sustainable financial mechanisms to meet the shared objectives under the three Rio Conventions.  The project's objective of reforming the administration of fees, fines, charges, taxes, and subsidies as they affect environmental protection is a critical need to ensuring streamlined financing of national activities for Moldova to meet international environmental obligations.

By reducing or eliminate environmentally harmful subsidies and reforming existing environmental subsidies and developing innovative financing mechanisms and instruments, specifically in the agricultural sector, the project will contribute to reduced anthropogenic pressures on natural resources from competing land uses and improved sustainable flows of agro-ecosystem services to sustaining the livelihoods of local communities as envisaged under the GEF land degradation strategy.

Undefined
Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (28.8602662311 47.0124429502)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Through improved identification of national circumstances, government agencies and other actors will increase their abilities to insulate at risk urban and rural populations from the adverse effects of climate change.
Financing Amount: 
480,000
Co-Financing Total: 
500,000
Project Details: 

Country Profile:

The Republic of Moldova is a landlocked country situated in south-eastern Europe, bordering Ukraine to the north, east and south; and Romania to the west. Proposed climate change adaptation measures include: the development and implementation of programs for repair and extension of forests; the reduction of water loss in irrigation and water consumption decrease in industry through the implementation of closed cycle water use; the implementation of agricultural systems adequate to the relief conditions that could reduce soil erosion; and the utilization of new plant species with higher resistance to elevated temperatures and insufficient humidity.

Due to its favorable climate and good farmland, Moldova’s economy depends heavily on agriculture, featuring fruits, vegetables, wine, and tobacco. Agriculture constitutes 22.3 percent of Moldova’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Consequently, changes in climate could adversely affect Moldova’s economy. Industry is another important component of Moldova’s economy, constituting 16.2 percent of GDP.

The Project:

This project was developed under the GEF's Strategic Approach to Enhance Capacity Building and priorities for targeted interventions under the GEF-5 Cross-Cutting Capacity Development Strategy.  To this end, the project targets Capacity Development Objective 4, which calls for the development of sustainable financial mechanisms to meet the shared objectives under the three Rio Conventions.  The project's objective of reforming the administration of fees, fines, charges, taxes, and subsidies as they affect environmental protection is a critical need to ensuring streamlined financing of national activities for Moldova to meet international environmental obligations.

This project will allow Moldova to meet other strategic focal area priorities under the GEF Operational Programmes.  This includes Objective 1 of the GEF Biodiversity focal area: Improve sustainability of protected area systems by improving the system of financial flows necessary to meet the recurrent costs of protected area management.  This project also responds to Objective 1 of the GEF Climate Change Mitigation focal area, which calls for demonstrating, deploying, and transferring innovative low-carbon technologies through policy reform that will be undertaken by the project at the level of the fiscal system in the energy sector.

By reducing or eliminate environmentally harmful subsidies and reforming existing environmental subsidies and developing innovative financing mechanisms and instruments, specifically in the agricultural sector, the project will contribute to reduced anthropogenic pressures on natural resources from competing land uses and improved sustainable flows of agro-ecosystem services to sustaining the livelihoods of local communities as envisaged under the GEF land degradation strategy.

The aim of the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) strategy is to assess how the project contributes to the reform of Moldova's current environmental fiscal management system in a way that institutionalizes improved financing of policy interventions that meet global and national environmental obligations and priorities.  The M&E strategy and plan will follow UNDP/GEF M&E procedures, and undertaken by the Project Management Unit (PMU), the Project Steering Committee, which will evolve into the Moldovan Environmental Fiscal Reform Commission (EFRC) during project implementation, and the UNDP Country Office, with support from UNDP/GEF Regional Coordination Unit (UNDP/GEF RCU) in Bratislava.  Monitoring and evaluation will also involve the different donor agencies involved in the co-financing and those who might be potentially mobilized in future. 

The M&E strategy and its accompanying plan will be fully developed during the inception phase, in accordance with the Project Results Framework (Annex A), with an emphasis on participatory evaluation.  The strategy will dictate an adaptive collaborative management approach to M&E in order to: a)  improve project implementation; b) strengthen project cost-effectiveness to deliver expected results; and c) institutionalize environmental fiscal reforms to ensure their institutional sustainability.  The M&E plan also includes: (i) an Inception Report (IR); (ii) Annual Progress Reports (APR); (iii) quarterly operational reports;  (iv) mid-term and final evaluations; and (v) the Capacity Development Scorecard.  The mid-term evaluation will be undertaken by a national consultant.  The project’s M&E Plan will be presented and finalized at the Project’s Inception Workshop following a collective identification and verification of project outputs and a fine-tuning of indicators, means of verification, and the full definition of project staff M&E responsibilities.

The baseline study for the monitoring and evaluation strategy will be established at the outset of the project with the support of the experts recruited by the project.  During the inception phase, an implementation manual will be developed, along with a communication strategy that will define a coordinated reporting strategy for all partners, and validated during the inception workshop.  The Project Management Unit will be tasked with preparing annual work plans and budgets, as well as consolidated semi-annual progress reports.  These reports will include narrative descriptions of the project and progress to date, as well as expenditures by component and categories of costs and recommendations.  An additional set of 11 indicators specific to EFR were formulated, and will be assessed during the project inception phase.  At this time, project stakeholder representatives (n>100) will be surveyed to re-assess the baseline of environmental fiscal reform through the Capacity Development Scorecard. 

The project will be subject to an independent final evaluation, taking place six months prior to the end of the project and when 90% of project deliverables have been satisfied.  The final evaluation will focus on contributions towards meeting and achieving: a) global environmental priorities; b) national and local impacts for environmental sustainability; and c) making recommendations to ensure the resilience of environmental fiscal reforms and institutional sustainability of project outcomes.  The Capacity Development Scorecard will be rated during the mid-point of project implementation as part of a mid-term evaluation undertaken by a national consultant, as well as part of the final evaluation to assess the extent to which the project is making a contribution to institutionalizing the sustainability of EFR and associated project outcomes.

Several project activities planned through the project focus on monitoring and reporting will also feed into the M&E plan.  For example, a series of case studies, lessons learned workshops reports and various technical papers resulting from the implementation of different project activities will strengthen the M&E plan of the project and ensure continuous reporting towards meeting the project’s objectives.

Source: Moldova Request for CEO Approval Document (July, 2011)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • Outcome 1: Reform of environmentally harmful subsidies, as well as environmental charges with a focus on the agriculture and energy sectors
    • Output 1.1: Introduce policy reform in the area of environmentally harmful subsidies
      • Output 1.1.1: Assessment of reform of energy and  agricultural subsidies and adoption of  appropriate legal amendments
    • Output 1.2: Reform of environmental charges and facilitation of eco-technology investments
      • Output 1.2.1: Assessment of reform of environmental charges and facilitation of eco-technology investments and adoption of  appropriate legal amendments
    • Output 1.3: Improved regulations and operational management of the National and Local Ecological Funds (NEF/LEFs)
      • Output 1.3.1:  Implementation of good international practice in NEF/LEF management
  • Outcome 2: Capacity development to engage and build consensus among all stakeholders
    • Output 2.1: Capacity building for EFR
      • Output 2.1.1:  EFR training needs assessed
      • Output 2.1.2: Training for NEF/LEF staff on new operational procedures is provided
    • Output 2.2: Communication and awareness
      • Output 2.2.1: A comprehensive information campaign is designed and implemented, including a dedicated EFR website
      • Output 2.2.2: Lessons Learned and Case Studies on EFR for national and global environmental goals
    • Output 2.3: A political dialogue is established
      • Output 2.3.1: Moldovan EFR Commission established and active
      • Output 2.3.2: Conferences and workshops implemented
  • Outcome 3: Integration of EFR in local and central planning processes
    • Output 3.1: EFR instruments integrated in the decentralization process
      • Output 3.1.1: EFR is integrated in the activities of the Working Group Financial Decentralization of the Joint Integrated Local Development Programme (JILDP)
      • Output 3.1.2:  Identification of environmental management priorities and potential local eco-taxes in pilot towns
    • Output 3.2: EFR instruments integrated into governmental budgeting and MTEF process
      • Output 3.2.1: Training on green budgeting and planning in line with OECD guidelines and good practices to  integrate global environmental priorities in Moldova's Medium-Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF)
      • Output 3.2.2: Building upon capacities developed, support the MoE in elaborating their budgets and MTEF submissions and evaluate the extent to which the MoE's budgeting process uses EFRs to better meet targeted environmental objectives, with particular emphasis on meeting Rio Convention objectives
      • Output 3.2.3: Building upon EFR best practices, update existing assessments and financing strategies within the framework of the MTEF  to implement the Rio Conventions, including the identification of realistic sources of funds through EFRs
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project Start:

Project Inception Workshop: will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. 

Daily:

Day to day monitoring of implementation progress: will be the responsibility of the Project Manager, based on the project's Annual Work Plan and its indicators, with overall guidance from the Project Director. The Project Team will inform the UNDP-CO of any delays or difficulties faced during implementation so that the appropriate support or corrective measures can be adopted in a timely and remedial fashion.

Quarterly:

Project Progress Reports (PPR): quarterly reports will be assembled based on the information recorded and monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Management Platform. Risk analysis will be logged and regularly updated in ATLAS.

Annually:

Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR): This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and GEF reporting requirements.  

Periodic Monitoring through Site Visits:

UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-Term of Project Cycle:

Mid-Term Evaluation: will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project’s term.  

End of Project:

Final Evaluation: will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and GEF guidance.  The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project’s results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals.  The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities.

Project Terminal Report: This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lie out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project’s results.

Learning and Knowledge Sharing:

Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. 

The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects.

Finally, there will be a two-way flow of information between this project and other projects of a similar focus.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Tom Twining-Ward
Regional Technical Advisor
UNDP
Nadja Vetters
Country Officer
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 

Ecosystem-Based Approach to Adaptation in Malawi

Malawi’s high dependency on rainfed, maize dominated agriculture, combined with poor urban planning in rural towns makes 85% of its populations highly vulnerable to climate change induced droughts, floods and post harvest grain losses. The government has embarked on two highly ambitious programmes: one on national agricultural input subsidy, to increase the use of inorganic fertilizers and maize production; the second on decentralized governance, making the District Councils and other local institutions the primary focus for delivery of developmental services to the rural populations.The effectiveness of these programmes is however being weakened by inadequate consideration of climate change induced risks to local development, particularly floods, droughts, pests and diseases affecting harvested but badly stored grains

This UNDP-GEF project is using two components to facilitate the use of an integrated package of ecological, physical and policy measures to reduce climate change related risks and improve the effectiveness of the baseline initiatives in Mangochi and Machinga Districts, in the upper Shire Basin. Ecological and physical infrastructure measures for water management will be adopted to regulate baseflow and  reduce risk of climate change driven floods while mitigating against droughts. In addition, climate safe post harvest management technologies and practices will reduce grain loss and increase food security. Replication and sustainability of these initiatives will be secured through mainstreaming climate change considerations and financing into local development programmes and a capacitated extension service

Undefined
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (33.7939453125 -12.6696441037)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Rural and urban population of Machinga and Mangochi Districts in Malawi.
Financing Amount: 
$5,318,200

Assessments and Background Documents

PIFs

Malawi PIF - 4508 (April 2012)

Co-Financing Total: 
$36,000,000
Project Details: 

The project will improve the effectiveness of the baseline programmes by securing the productivity gains in spite of climate change driven risks, primarily in two districts (Mangochi and Machinga), which cover an area of over a million hectares with a total population of about one million people, with a roughly 50:50 distribution on gender lines. The project is expected to work directly in villages with about 25% of the population (up to 250,000 people). Women and youth constitute a large percentage of farmers; broad participation of all relevant groups will be secured through formulation of a gender strategy to guide targeting of project initiatives. Specifically, it will improve household food security, nutrition and incomes by increasing and diversifying farm productivity with low input costs and expansion of irrigation. Adoption of the climate safe post harvest management technologies and practices will increase food security by reducing post harvest losses of grains.

Improved water harvesting will modify water flow during both droughts and heavy rains, further reducing the impacts of droughts and floods on farmers and food security. Together with increased water harvesting by rural dwellings, these measures will increase water availability, reducing the cost (labour, illnesses) incurred through the current difficulties in regulating water for domestic use throughout the year.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1.1: Public and domestic water harvesting, storage and distribution reduces climate change driven flooding and regulates availability of water throughout the year in  flood & drought hotspots

  • Output 1.1.1: Public water harvesting and storage: 3 community based check dams constructed in strategic places to capture and store water, reducing risk of climate change induced floods while regularizing availability of water through wet and dry seasons
  • Output 1.1.2: Water harvesting from dwellings: percentage of farmers harvesting water from rooftops increase by at least 50% and boosts the percentage of farmers accessing clean domestic water in years of drought from a low of 10% to at least 25%
  • Output 1.1.3: Water harvesting and use on farms: percentage of farmers adopting improved water harvesting and retention (such as pools, dams, pits, retaining ridges, etc.) and using it to irrigate crops in the pilot communities increases by at least 25% and increase yields of key crops by more than 30%;

Outcome 1.2: Landscape level ecological measures complementing physical water management infrastructure to reduce risk of climate change induced floods and enhance resilience against unusually harsh and frequent droughts in selected hotspots (covering over 500,000 ha of farmlands and 6 urban centres)

  • Output 1.2.1: Rehabilitation of badly degraded lands in selected hotspots improves land cover, infiltration and base flow;  increasing the ability of the landscape to regulate water flow during droughts and floods, offering ecological protection from climate change induced droughts and floods;
  • Output 1.2.2: Adoption of conservation agriculture practices, integration of agroforestry species, short-cycle, drought-tolerant crop varieties and multiple-use tree species by more than 30% of the farmers increases water retention capacity by the soils, reducing impacts of climate change intensified drought by at least 30%
  • Output 1.2.3: Water use efficiency in small scale irrigation systems improved by over 40% to address climate induced irregularity of rainfall patterns (drought) while improving productivity of the land by more than 10%.
  • Output 1.2.4: Establishment of small-scale flood reduction infrastructure  in selected urban areas (such as water diversion structures, gabions, culverts) integrated with ecological measures (such as protective vegetation, hillside terraces planted with perennial trees and shrubs, stone bunds) improve water drainage and reduce damage from intense climate change induced floods.

Outcome 1.3: Adoption of climate safe post harvest management technologies and practices by > 50% of grain farmers reduce climate induced grain loss by > 30%

  • Output 1.3.1: Skills and institutional arrangements for individual and/or communal climate safe post harvest management practices and storage facilities disseminated, leading to adoption of improved practices by more than 50% and a reduction in post harvest losses of more than 30% of current baseline (baseline to be established at ppg);
  • Output 1.3.2: Financing institutions, local artisans,  marketing channels and the extension service set up to support the demonstration, upscaling and sustainability of the improved climate safe post harvest management practices and technologies

Outcome 2.1: Capacity of District level technical officers to support implementation, maintenance and monitoring of the activities under component 1 and to mainstream climate risks into all local developemnt process (skills, legislation, information)

  • Output 2.1.1: The extension service capacitated with skills (though training) and other support systems to integrate up-to-date information and techniques for mainstreaming climate change risks into the current and future extension support to land users and farmers;
  • Output 2.1.2: Research on local impacts of climate change and adaptation techniques supported to provide a scientific backbone to the mainstreaming of climate change considerations into local development, and linked to extension service for dissemination of more up to date information on weather, risks of drought and flooding to farmers and urban dwellers.
  • Output 2.1.3: A participatory M&E system formulated and implemented to monitor effects of the project on the baseline investments and livelihoods; lessons drawn and disseminated through the regional and national platforms (as well as used to support adaptive management);
  • Output 2.1.4: District councils, local authorities, district planning units and officers of the Ministry of Finance and Development Planning and National Housing Development Authority trained to recognize climate risk problems in new and existing investment projects and apply/recommend/enforce targeted risk reduction and risk management measures;
  • Output 2.1.5: Structural engineers, urban and rural infrastructure planners and teaching staff from technical colleges and vocational training institutes provided with skills on climate-resilient construction, land use and water resources planning

Outcome 2.2:– Local and national development policies influenced by the project supported pilots to strengthen policies and policy enforcement for climate consideration in development

  • Output 2.2.1: Two districts revise local development policy making it mandatory to integrate climate risk considerations  in the design, appraisal and approval process of district development, including the implemenaiton of the agricultural input subsidy programme and civil works (infrastructre and building);
  • Output 2.2.2: Agreement on, and operationalization of district level institutional arrangement for the long-term implementation of the ecological and physical measures and management plans, including enforcement of environmental regulations identified, and operationalized;
  • Output 2.2.3: Two Districts review planning processes to provide greater coherence, coordination and integration between climate change, agricultural-led local development and food security policy processes;
  • Output 2.2.4: A national “Year of Land Care ” launched to promote wide scale awareness of the cost effectiveness of  integrating ecological and physical measures as a means of  mitigating impacts of climate change driven floods and droughts;
  • Output 2.2.5:  Lessons generated at the project/district level fed into the national climate programme, SLM platform and other national planning debates, to lobby and influence the adoption of climate risk considerations as minimum criteria for accessing agricultural input subsidy benefits.

 

Contacts: 
UNDP
Jan Rijpma
CO Focal Point
UNDP
Veronica Muthui
Regional Technical Advisor
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
LDCF
Project Status: 

Adaptation to Climate Change Impacts in Mountain Forest Ecosystems of Armenia

Containing more than half the region’s floral diversity and over 300 species of trees and bushes, Armenia’s forest ecosystems form a vital eco-corridor that extends through the Eastern Lesser Caucasus. Although these forests are a biodiversity hotspot and a global conservation priority, the region has been identified as critically vulnerable, especially to the risks posed by climate change.

Given the significant value of preserving the area’s biodiversity, this project is working to enhance the forest’s resilience through improving ecological restoration, preventing forest fires and fighting pests. Targeting 75,000 hectares of land, UNDP, in cooperation with scientists, government officials, forestry enterprises, and local communities, is working to preserve the forests. Efforts are also being made to support the local communities to participate in and benefit from the adaptation efforts.

By integrating measures to adapt to climate change, the project is also responding to anticipated environmental changes that will occur over the next 25 to 50-years. The immediate focus of pilot adaptation measures are in the Syunik region in south-east of Armenia, but the project may be of broader relevance to all mountain forest ecosystems in Armenia.

For updates on UNDP Early Warning Systems and Climate Resilient Development projects, click here.

Undefined
Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (46.2521179118 39.2745203231)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The local communities in the Syunik region in south-east Armenia, but with broader relevance to all mountain forest ecosystems in Armenia.

Reports and Publications by country teams

Knowledge Products

Case Study

UNDP-ALM Case Study - Armenia - September 2010

Assessments and Background Documents

Armenia - Second National Communication (2010)

ProDocs

Project Document Armenia Adaptation MSP

Brochures, Posters, Communications Products

Project Overview - October 2010 - Armenia

Financing Amount: 
GEF Trust Fund: US$950,000; Total project cost: US$2,850,000 (as of Sep 2010)
Co-Financing Total: 
$1,900,000 (as of Sep 2010)
Project Details: 

The climate of Armenia’s Syunik region is remarkably diverse due to its complex topography. The high altitude above sea level, orientation of the mountain ranges, and occluded borders of the river valleys and basins has a notably large impact on the local climate. In general, the climate is quite dry owing to the high elevation of the terrain above sea level and its relief. The annual precipitation in the Syunik region is irregular, as is the distribution of the rainfall, which varies dramatically in certain areas and increases with elevation. Analysis of observed data from 1978-2007 shows that there has been a significant reduction of precipitation in the area. Projections based on statistical analysis suggest that a further reduction of precipitation is very likely during the next 2-3 decades. Although it is less alarming than reductions in precipitation, air temperature increases have been reported. Average air temperature during the period of 1935-2007 has increased by 0.7°C during the summer season.

If climate change scenarios become reality, based on these projections, more than 17,000 hectares of forest might disappear in Armenia as a result of the worsening forest growth conditions (5-5.5%). Expected climate changes could adversely affect forest ecosystems by worsening sanitary conditions, enlarging the spread of pests and diseases and increasing fire hazards. In this case, forests in the southeastern forested areas will be the most vulnerable. Moreover, with the expected temperature increases in the already arid climate, the probability of more intensive forest fires will rise. This particular danger is more imminent for forests in central, southern and southeastern forested areas.

In response to the problems outlined above, the project Adaptation to Climate Change in the Mountain Forest Ecosystems of Armenia has been designed to help Armenia develop strategies to cope with the consequences of climate change. In order to enhance the adaptive capacities of the vulnerable mountain forest ecosystems in the pilot region, the project will undertake activities in the Goris and Kapan districts of Syunik and also in “Arevik” National Park in Meghri district. Selected adaptation measures aim to reduce forest fragmentation, improve ecological restoration and mitigate increased pest outbreak and forest fire risks exacerbated by climate change. With a high value placed on long-term monitoring and careful project documentation, lessons from the project are expected to be replicated in other mountain forest ecosystems of central and northern Armenia.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1:    The enabling environment for integrating climate change risks into management of forest ecosystems is in place.
    

  • Output 1.1:     Planning documents that govern forest management modified to take account of climate change risks
  • Output 1.2:     An early warning and response system to climate change risks based on clearly defined institutional roles and responsibilities


Outcome 2:    Forest and protected area management in the Syunik region integrates pilot adaptation measures to enhance adaptive capacity of mountain forest ecosystems
    

  • Output 2.1:     Comprehensive system for data collection and interpretation to feed into scenario development and identification of adaptation measures
  • Output 2.2:     Measures to mitigate elevated pest outbreak risks due to climate change, including variability
  • Output 2.3:     Measures to mitigate elevated forest fire risk due to climate change, including variability
  • Output 2.4:     Measures to reduce forest fragmentation and improve ecological restoration


Outcome 3:    Capacities for adaptive management, learning and replication of project lessons are developed.
    

  • Output 3.1:     Training and sharing of experiences with foresters and community members from other regions/ sub-regions in Armenia to develop their capacities to integrate adaptive measures in forest management
  • Output 3.2:     A user-friendly manual on how to integrate climate change risks in forest management is developed and widely disseminated
  • Output 3.3:    A results-based monitoring, evaluation and learning system is in place
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project monitoring and evaluation will be conducted in accordance with established UNDP and GEF procedures by the project team and the UNDP Country Office (UNDP-CO), with support from the UNDP/GEF Regional Coordination Unit in Bratislava. The Logical Framework Matrix provides performance and impact indicators for project implementation along with their corresponding means of verification. The logframe is developed based on UNDP/GEF impact monitoring framework at adaptation project level, specifically, technical paper (TA) on natural resource management.

Since the proposed project falls under the following broad category – “The reduction of anthropogenic stresses on resources experiencing increased stress due to climate change, and enhancement of the resilience and adaptive capacity of natural systems in order that they are sustained in the face of climate change” – the corresponding indicators have been customized. Main indicators are designed to help detect (i) introduction of new policies, regulatory frameworks and management plans that are devised based on scenario planning; (ii) reduction in ecosystem fragmentation containing natural resources of concern, leading to enhanced resilience (iii) Number of sites/locations where stress reduction measures are piloted (iv) learning and replication potential..

Additionally, given that the target of adaptation measures is globally significant ecosystems, the project team has been guided by the GEF’s METT (Tracking Tool for SP2- Mainstreaming Biodiversity) in identifying indicators for measuring the biodiversity benefit of additional adaptation measures. Based on a review of the METT proxy indicators, two indicators (one relating to territorial coverage (ha) and the other to integration of adaptation measures in the forest sector management planning documents) have been selected. Logframe indicators will form the basis on which the project's Monitoring and Evaluation system will be built.

In addition, Output 3.3 of the project relates specifically to monitoring, evaluation and adaptive management capacities over the long term through the establishment of a long term monitoring programme. The M&E plan includes: inception report, annual project implementation reviews, quarterly operational reports, and independent mid-term and final evaluations. GORA will provide the Resident Representative with certified periodic financial statements, and with an annual audit of the financial statements relating to the status of UNDP (including GEF) funds according to the established procedures set out in the Programming and Finance manuals. The Audit will be conducted by the legally recognized auditor of the Government, or by a commercial auditor engaged by the Government.

The project's Monitoring and Evaluation Plan will be presented and finalized at the Project's Inception Meeting following a collective fine-tuning of indicators, means of verification, and the full definition of project staff M&E responsibilities.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Armen Martirosyan
Country Office Focal Point
UNDP
Aram Ter-Zakaryan
UNDP/GEF Project Task Leader, UNDP Armenia
UNDP
Anna Kaplina
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
spa
Project Status: 

Strengthening Livelihoods and Climate-Resilience in the Guinean Prefectures of Gaoual, Koundara and Mali

Agriculture and livestock are the main economic activities in the prefectures of Gaoual, Koundara and Mali. However, while their importance for the economy and community livelihoods is undeniable, agriculture and livestock farming in Gaoual, Koundara and Mali remain of subsistence, dependent entirely on the natural resource potential and characterized by unsustainable environmental practices.The agriculture and livestock production are currently facing several constraints which limit their productivity and render them highly vulnerable to any external shock including climate effects. In these prefectures, the huge expansion of Bowe land reduces the areas of farmable land.

In response to the above challenges, the Government of Guinea, supported by its development partners including UNDP, has developed several initiatives which provide a comprehensive baseline for Strengthening Farmers Communities Livelihoods Resilience Against Climate Changes in the Guinean Prefectures of Gaoual, Koundara and Mali .

Undefined
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-13.1176696727 11.7881306404)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Rural communities of Guinea Prefectures of Gaoual, Kaundara and Mali

Reports and Publications by country teams

Résumé Des Études 2014-2016

Presentation

Fiche Presentation REMECCGKM

Newsletter

Bulletin d’information en agroforesterie

Financing Amount: 
$3,816,364
Co-Financing Total: 
$50,630,000
Project Details: 

More details to come...

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Component 1:Local authorities and decentralized institutions strengthened to integrate climate change issues in regional PNDA action plans through local development plans (PLDs), annual and multi-year investments plans (PAIs/MIPs) and annual community budgets (BCAs) of the 15 most vulnerable GKM Rural Development Communities (CRD)

  • Output 1.1: 300 GKM CRD councils members, Urban Districts councils members, and decentralized institution staffs are sensitized about climate change risks, trained on how to integrate climate change risks and support the implementation of agroforestry in the implementation of regional PNDA action plans through the PLDs, PAIs and BCAs.
  • Output 1.1: Community based land, forest and watershed management plans and regulation tools (custom laws and agreements) are developed and implemented for the enforcement of the agro-hydro-climatic zoning of the Prefectures of GKM developed in the framework of the output 2.1.1 in order to orient agro-sylvo-pastoral activities towards the most appropriate areas and promote the implementation of agroforestry as strategy to adapt to climate changes in the prefectures of Gaoual, Koundara and Mali. These tools will coordinate with the strategic plan of the Guinea-Guinea Bissau trans-boundary Protected Areas developed in the framework of the AGIR project. Indeed, the AGIR project (2000 - 2005) has supported the production of a strategic plan for the management of the Guinea - Guinea Bissau trans-boundary Protected Area (the Guinean section of this trans-boundary PA is located in the prefectures of Gaoual, Koundara and Boke) and which organize the agriculture, livestock and other economic activities in the PA and its surroundings. This outcome will additionally assess and codify the experience and knowledge generated from the application of these custom laws and provided to the decision makers for an improvement of the regulatory framework.
  • Output 1.3: Local development plans (PLDs), annual and multi-years investments programmes (PAIs/MIPs) and annual community budgets (BCAs) of the 15 most vulnerable GKM Rural Development Communities (CRD) are updated to integrate climate change risks and dispositions to address the technical, financial, institutional, regulatory, organizational, and other constraints to climate resilient agroforestry scaling-up as adaptation strategies.

Component 2: Agro-meteorological information are produced and disseminated to the most appropriate stakeholders of the prefectures of GKM for climate resilient agroforestry

  • Output 2.1: An agro-meteorological action plan is developed and implemented in the 3 prefectures of Gaoual, Koundara and Mali. The action plan will allow to: i) determine the required agro-meteorological information needed for a climate resilient agroforestry; ii) identify the needs for capacity building to obtain the necessary agro-meteorological information; iii) design and organize capacity building for key institutions; iv) organize production and dissemination of priority agro-meteorological information to the appropriate end-users;
  • Output 2.2: Local multidisciplinary group for agro-meteorological assistance (LGMAs) in each of the 15 most vulnerable CRDs are established to coordinate the gathering of climatic information as well as the production and dissemination of agro-meteorological information and advisory support. The LGMAs will be made up of local representatives from the DMN, the agricultural, livestock, environment, water resources, fauna and forestry resources ministries, of the community based organizations, local NGOs and other relevant institutions.
  • Output 2.3: An agro-hydro-climatic zoning of the prefectures of GKM (vulnerable lands, forests and watercourses, areas for types of crops, for grazing, watercourses for irrigations etc) is elaborated and submitted to local authorities and decentralized institutions to support the elaboration of climate resilient PLDs and PAIs and the promotion of resilient agroforestry strategies.

Component 3: Community livelihood options are made more climate resilient in the 15 most vulnerable CRDs of Gaoual, Koundara and Mali

  • Output 3.1: Training package on climate resilient agroforestry is designed and implemented for 1,500 farmers from the 15 most vulnerable CRDs in GKM prefectures. This training programme will firstly start by a training of trainers who will replicate the training to other farmers. This output will also, with the support of the Agriculture research center of Bareng (in Guinea) and other relevant international research center, develop training modules and methodologies that other projects and programmes could use beyond the project life and scope.
  • Output 3.2: An advisory support group, made up of the trainers trained as a result of output 3.1, and selected members of the AAGs have established to provide climate resilient agroforestry advice to farmers. This output will also put at the disposal of the local authorities of a strategic document for the maintaining of this advisory group beyond the project life to ensure the sustainability of this service. This strategy will assess the feasibility of the privatization of this service through its inclusion in package of support service provided by the farmers associations to their members and the assessment of their willingness to pay such service.
  • Output 3.3: 200 community farms are supported (farmers organization, farm lay-out, acquisition of resilient seeds and tree species, farm running) to implement climate resilient agroforestry technologies in the prefectures of GKM. Additionally, this output, with the support of the research sector in Guinea, will support the assessment and the codification of the experiences and knowledge generated from these community agroforestry farms and their dissemination in Gaoual, Koundara and Mali and beyond the project areas and life.
  • Output 3.4: An operational supply chain for the production and diffusion of drought resistant agroforestry inputs (trees, crop seeds and livestock species) is established in Gaoual, Koundara and Mali. This output will support the development of nurseries of climate resilient trees and livestock species, facilitate the acquisition of resilient main staple crop seeds, and the dissemination of these inputs to the farmers of Gaoual, Koundara and Mali.
  • Output 3.5: A strategy to support the commercialization of products derived from agroforestry is implemented in the prefectures of Gaoual, Koundara and Mali. This strategy will consist in supporting the organization of agroforestry farmers, the establishment of small units for the conservation and transformation of agroforestry products related to the multifunctional platform project, the implementation of marketing actions and infrastructures, the establishment of a label proper to these agroforestry products, the development of a channel of agroforestry products linking producers to consumers.

As detailed in the 12-7-2011 - Guinea Project Identification Form [attached]

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

The implementation of the project's activities will reflect GEF monitoring and evaluation standards and procedures as well as UNDP guidelines on monitoring and evaluation of projects on adaptation policy. Details for monitoring and evaluation will be articulated during the project development phase.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Henry Rene Diouf
Regional Technical Advisor
UNDP
Mohamed Efas Sylla
CO Focal Point
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
ldcf
Project Status: 

Enhancing Resilience to Climate Change in Vulnerable Coastal Communities in Gambia

The project, 'Enhancing Resilience of Vulnerable Coastal Areas and Communities to Climate Change in the Republic of Gambia',  will restore and maintain 2,500 ha of the mangroves forests of Tanbi Wetlands (of which 177,285 Gambian depends directly or indirectly on their economic activities, its buffer zones, sewage sinks and coastal stabilization roles), the North Bank, Western and lower river regions through a co-management approach to act as an additional buffer against climate-induced pressures in coastal areas. These mangroves will directly complement hard physical measures designed to project lowland rice growing and economic investment in coastal areas (fish landing sites, hotels)  and will be planned an implemented alongside these hard measures through participatory planning

Also, climate resilient wetland and fisheries management strategies (such as resilient fisheries and wetland management plans, custom rules for wetland access and exploitation, community monitoring of fisheries quotas,) will be introduced and transferred to vulnerable communities in at least 20 wards in the Lower ans Central Valleys.

Undefined
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
GEOMETRYCOLLECTION (POINT (-16.5893524145 13.336522519), POINT (-16.5893524145 13.336522519))
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Gambian coastal communities

Project Brief / Fact Sheet

Project Brief: Gambia (August 2015)

Financing Amount: 
$8,900,000
Co-Financing Total: 
$41,388,000
Project Details: 

The project objective is to reduce Gambia’s vulnerability to sea-level rise and associated impacts of climate change by improving coastal defenses and enhancing adaptive capacities of coastal communities.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1: Climate change vulnerability of development activities and investments in coastal areas reduced through the design and construction of coastal protection measures

This outcome will finance additional investments in hard and soft coastal protection measures to help maintain critical economic infrastructure, as well as key livelihood activities, in the face of sea level rise and coastal degradation.

Outcome 2: Rural livelihoods in the coastal zone enhanced and protected from the impacts of climate change through the demonstration and the transfer of successful coastal adaptation technologies and the introduction of economic diversification
This outcome will finance the demonstration and the transfer to communities Climate resilient wetland and fisheries management and planning methods

Contacts: 
UNDP
Henry Diouf
Regional Technical Advisor
UNDP
Almay Camara
CO Focal Point
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
ldcf
Project Status: 
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